[ilds] Durrell's Accent

Durrell School of Corfu durrells at otenet.gr
Wed May 30 10:58:40 PDT 2007


'Clipped' is exactly how I recall D's accent, especially when he referred to 
someone else being 'arch'. RP
----- Original Message ----- 
From: "Bruce Redwine" <bredwine1968 at earthlink.net>
To: "Durrell list" <ilds at lists.uvic.ca>
Sent: Wednesday, May 30, 2007 7:23 PM
Subject: [ilds] Durrell's Accent


> Denise Tart and David Green call Durrell's accent "impeccably posh." 
> That's not my sense of it, but I'm not British.  In 1961, I heard him 
> reading his poetry on an LP, and my reaction then was that his accent was 
> not "upper class."  I associate that with the Oxbridge accent (having 
> little exposure to the Queen).  How would a Brit classify Durrell's 
> accent?  Accent tells a lot about a person and his or her persona.  I 
> assume that whatever accent he had that it was natural and not affected, 
> as some people's can be.  Brits speak of the upper class accent as being 
> "clipped" -- a phonetic description I've never understood.  Can someone 
> also explain this?
>
> Bruce
>
>
>>>From: Denise Tart & David Green <dtart at bigpond.net.au>
>>>Sent: May 30, 2007 12:43 AM
>>>To: Durrel <ilds at lists.uvic.ca>
>>>Subject: [ilds] AUSSIE ETHER: DURRELL AND THE EMPIRE
>>>
>>>RP wrote recently of the Aussie ether. What he was refering to I have no 
>>>notion of except that recent emails have mentioned Durrell's love hate 
>>>relationship with with the mother country (not cuntry - as one of my 
>>>students recently spelt it, though perhaps this is apt) which we in 
>>>Australia, as a member of the British Commonwealth and as a former 
>>>colony, feel very strongly. Like Durrell many of us born in the empire 
>>>outside Britain to middle class parents were brought up to respect and 
>>>imitate the values and conduct of the English Gentleman and yet, upon 
>>>aquaintance with that country, even given our education, intellect and 
>>>conduct we were (are) regarded as inferior and indeed condescended to. 
>>>Durrell never felt accepted in England even though his accent was 
>>>impeccably posh. His experience of pudding island I believe resonates 
>>>with many 'colonials' possibly even with Americans although you guys 
>>>fought off the British (with French help) and have become an empire 
>>>yourselves l!
> eading to a huge sense of cultural importance. When I read Durrell I very 
> much feel his sense of colonial misplacement. Successful Aussie writers go 
> to London or increasingly to New York. Durrell stayed in the 
> Mediterranean, moved around a lot, took comfort in the bottle and probably 
> never felt truly at home in any country.
>>>
>>>
>>>Denise Tart & David Green
>>>16 William Street, Marrickville NSW 2204
>>>
>
>
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