[CaBSSem] Neuroscientist Richard R. Brown (Dalhousie) on updating Hebb 3:30 Tuesday 14 March

Psychology Chair psychair at uvic.ca
Sat Mar 11 10:22:29 PST 2023


Richard Brown was an undergrad PSYC major at UVic and has a distinguished career at Dalhousie. Best known for mouse models of the genetics of social behaviour, cognition, and disorders such as Alzheimer's and Fragile X Syndrome. This talk aims to "Revise Hebbian theories of synaptic plasticity, the cell assembly, and phase sequence underlying learning and memory to reflect the current understanding of synaptic plasticity."
>From 3:30 to 4:50 on Tuesday 14 March in the Psychology Reading Room, Cornett A258

Revising the Hebb Synapse for the 21st Century
Richard E. Brown
Department of Psychology and Neuroscience
Dalhousie University, Halifax Nova Scotia, Canada B3H 4R2

Abstract
Background. In 1949, Donald O. Hebb developed his neuropsychological postulate, which involved three neural processes: synaptic modifications (i.e., the Hebb Synapse), the cell assembly, and the phase sequence. The Hebb synapse describes how activity at pre- and post-synaptic neurons modulates the strength of a synapse (and synaptic networks). The Hebb synapse theory was based on electrical synapses, but the discovery of synaptic plasticity at NMDA receptors and the discovery of long-term potentiation and long-term depression provided evidence for the chemical nature of the Hebb synapse.
Aims. While the concept of the Hebb Synapse and cell assembly have withstood the test of time and are still useful today, much more is now known about the synapse than was known in 1949. The aim of this project is to revise the concept of the Hebb synapse and cell assembly for the 21st century.
Methods. All relevant research on synaptic activity for the last 70 years has been examined to create a model of synaptic activity and synaptic plasticity underlying cognitive function and dysfunction in the brain.
Results. A 'hepta-partite' model of the synapse is proposed to account for the role of astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, microglia, the extracellular matrix (ECM), and the neurovascular unit (NVU) in the regulation of synaptogenesis and modulation of synaptic activity/plasticity.
Conclusion. Based on this new information, we revise Hebbian theories of synaptic plasticity, the cell assembly, and phase sequence underlying learning and memory to reflect the current understanding of synaptic plasticity, while upholding the legacy of Donald Hebb.   This new model is applied to synaptopathies as well as neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative diseases.



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D. Stephen Lindsay, Ph.D
Professor and Chair
Department of Psychology
University of Victoria
https://oac.uvic.ca/lindsaylab/
Pronouns: He/him

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