[CaBSSem] [Psychat] CaBSSem Friday 14 Oct: Tarek Amer on age-related changes in cognitive control

Stephen Lindsay slindsay at uvic.ca
Tue Oct 11 09:18:29 PDT 2022


Some months DO have a Friday the 15th (as per my earlier announcement of this talk). But not this one!


Steve


 ====================================

D. Stephen Lindsay, Ph.D.

Professor and Chair of Psychology

University of Victoria

https://onlineacademiccommunity.uvic.ca/lindsaylab/

@dstephenlindsay

pronouns: He/him/his



________________________________
From: Psychat <psychat-bounces at lists.uvic.ca> on behalf of Stephen Lindsay <slindsay at uvic.ca>
Sent: October 10, 2022 9:57 PM
To: 'psychat'; 'cabssem at lists.uvic.ca'
Subject: [Psychat] CaBSSem Friday 15 Oct: Tarek Amer on age-related changes in cognitive control

The Cognition and Brain Science Seminar (CaBSSem) this Friday from 2:30 in the Psychology Reading Room (Cornett A228) features one of our newest faculty members, Dr. Tarek Amer, speaking on Reduced Cognitive Control Shapes Cognition with Old Age.



Many attend FTF, but we also livestream the sessions at

https://uvic.zoom.us/j/84838166840?pwd=YndMWWFNUlllV0FuQjVnMndPMUpyZz09

Meeting ID: 848 3816 6840  Password: 982785

For students/faculty at UVic, best practice is to launch the Zoom app and then click "Sign in with SSO" so that you access the call from the UVic Zoom.



Schedule at https://onlineacademiccommunity.uvic.ca/lindsaylab/open-science/ .   If you would like to host a session of cabssem please email me.  Dates assigned on a first-come/first-served basis.



Hope to see you Friday.



Abstract:

Cognitive control, or the ability to selectively focus attention on task-relevant information, while simultaneously ignoring task-irrelevant information, has been shown to be reduced with old age. While most research has focused on how reduced control negatively impacts task performance, my work is aimed at understanding how the relationship between reduced control and performance in older adults is context dependent. In particular, my work examines how reduced cognitive control impacts the type of information that is encoded and retained in memory, and the surprising benefits this can have for older adults. In this talk, I will present evidence that reduced control in older adults is (a) associated with enhanced memory for irrelevant information that can boost performance on future tasks, (b) characterized by reduced regulation of the default mode network (DMN; a set of brain regions that are involved in internally directed cognition and are typically suppressed during exte!
 rnally oriented tasks), and (c) can support memory for information that draws on prior knowledge and engages the DMN.


=========================
D. Stephen Lindsay, Ph.D
Professor and Chair
Department of Psychology
University of Victoria

Pronouns: He/him

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